Claude Desplan

Silver Professor; Professor of Biology

D.Sc./Ph.D. 1983, Université Paris VII; B.S. 1975, Ecole Normale Supérieure St Cloud, France.

Office Address: 

New York University
Department of Biology
1009 Silver Center
100 Washington Square East
New York, NY 10003-6688

Phone: 

(212) 998-8218

Fax: 

(212) 995-4710

Areas of Research/Interest: 

Genetic and Mechanistic approaches to development. From the early embryo to the Drosophila visual system.

Bio

A member of the New York University faculty since 1999, Claude Desplan’s areas of research include developmental biology, genetics, and evolution. Using the relatively “simple” genetics of the fruit fly embryo, his research has helped illuminate evolution of embryonic patterning in arthropods, as well as the neurobiology of color vision. A former Howard Hughes Investigator, he has been honored by many institutions, including the Ecole Normale Supérieure de St Cloud, the Fondation Simone et Cino Del Duca, and the Fondation pour la Recherche sur le Cancer. He has won fellowships from the Fogarty International Center and European Molecular Biology Organization, and was an Andre Meyer Fellow at the Rockefeller University. As a teacher, he has developed a range of undergraduate and graduate courses including developmental neurobiology, molecular genetics and evolution and development. Professor Desplan earned his D.Sc./Ph.D. from Université Paris VII and his BsS. from the Ecole Normale Supérieure de St Cloud.

Fellowships/Honors:

Ecole Normale Supérieure de Saint Cloud, "Agregation" in Physiology and Biochemistry (Paris); Award from the Fondation Simone et Cino Del Duca; Award from the Fondation pour la Recherche sur le Cancer; Postdoctoral Fellow from the Fogarty International Center and European Molecular Biology Organization; Andre Meyer Fellow, The Rockefeller University; Howard Hughes Medical Institute Associate Investigator, 1988-1999. 2007: elected Fellow of the New York Academy of Sciences. elected member of the AAAS. 2008: elected associate member of EMBO.

Silver Dialogues Essay

Although the types of eyes found across the animal kingdom vary extensively in general organization and complexity, all visual systems use similar mechanisms to respond to environmental cues. In particular, all animals use related opsin photopigment proteins in their photoreceptor cells to capture photons (for review, see Arendt & Wittbrodt 2001). Read More...

Updated on 08/14/2014