Hartry Field

Professor of Philosophy

B.A., Wisconsin; M.A., Ph. D. Harvard

Bio

A member of the NYU faculty since 1997, Hartry Field specializes in metaphysics, philosophy of mathematics, philosophy of logic, and the philosophy of science. He received fellowships from the National Science Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Guggenheim Foundation, and most recently, was elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He is also a winner of the Lakatos Prize, which is awarded once every two years to the scholar who is judged to be making the most profound contributions to the philosophy of science. The author of many works, including Science Without Numbers; Realism, Mathematics and Modality; and Truth and the Absence of Fact, his current research interests include objectivity and indeterminacy, a priori knowledge, causation, and the semantic and set-theoretic paradoxes. A gifted teacher, he has developed a tremendous student following that seeks him out as a mentor and thesis advisor. Professor Field received his M.A. and Ph.D. from Harvard University and his B.A. from the University of Wisconsin.

Silver Dialogues Essay

Can there be rational reasons for revising our most fundamental logical rules (for instance, the rule of inferring from A to A or B; or the rule of inferring from A or B and not A to B)? I think there can. Read More...

Updated on 04/18/2012